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Why this red oak tree...


mowin

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So I've noticed certain reds are getting more activity than others, why?  

I've seen several deer under a certain red oak, including some ok bucks, but several other reds that are dropping and only 60 yards from this one, are getting ignored.  

 

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42 minutes ago, mowin said:

So I've noticed certain reds are getting more activity than others, why?  

I've seen several deer under a certain red oak, including some ok bucks, but several other reds that are dropping and only 60 yards from this one, are getting ignored.  

 

It’s the age old question. Find an answer and go on tour giving presentations for $250 a person and sell out theaters of deer hunters. :)
 

About 5 years ago was our last decent red acorn fall. I had one small flat of maybe 12 nice reds that saw a big buck daily. Unfortunately for me, 100% nocturnal. 

"A sinking fly is closer to Hell" - Anonymous 

 

https://www.troutscapes.com

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11 minutes ago, Bucksnbows said:

It’s the age old question. Find an answer and go on tour giving presentations for $250 a person and sell out theaters of deer hunters. :)
 

About 5 years ago was our last decent red acorn fall. I had one small flat of maybe 12 nice reds that saw a big buck daily. Unfortunately for me, 100% nocturnal. 

I'll take your credit card number please....

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Just now, G-man said:

All reds are not created equal.  They hybridized easily ,obviously  one has less tannin in the nuts and thus are "sweeter"

Odd thing is, two of the reds too the left side are twice the size (3' across) and the one to the right is a youth with large caps and small fruit. 

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Thoughts from ChatGPT

Why would deer prefer smaller acorns from the same type of red oak tree?
 
ChatGPT

Deer may prefer smaller acorns from the same type of red oak tree for several reasons:

  1. Easier to Handle: Smaller acorns are more manageable for deer to pick up and manipulate with their mouths.

  2. Lower Energy Expenditure: Smaller acorns may require less effort to consume, reducing the energy expenditure required to extract the nutritious content.

  3. Reduced Jaw Strain: Smaller acorns may place less strain on a deer's jaw muscles and teeth during consumption.

  4. Seasonal Availability: Smaller acorns might be more readily available during certain times of the year when larger ones are scarce, making them a preferred food source.

  5. Nutrient Content: The nutritional content of smaller acorns may be preferred by deer, depending on their energy and nutrient requirements at a given time.

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Red hybrids occur naturally, but are difficult to find due to their rarity. Because they are crosses between two species of red oak, red oak hybrids often exhibit traits making them more desirable to wildlife- 

 

Acorns from red oak hybrids are often preferred by wildlife over regular red oaks.  Animals seem to single out the hybrids, the exact reason is unknown, but what we do know is wildlife seem to prefer the red hybrids over other red oaks in the area.

 

Red hybrids can be more prolific and consistent producers from year to year, compared to regular red oaks. This is likely due to a combination of vigor, resistance to disease and insects, and ability to be pollinated by more than one other species of oaks. 

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Often times it's simply a matter of location.  Food sources that are along their preferred route are fed on while others seem to be ignored.

Concerning smaller red oak acorns,  the black oak is in the red oak family and looks almost identical to the red.  It's acorns are a little smaller on average than the red.

Do you have any pictures of the red oak?  Bark, leaves, acorns?    
 

 

 

Edited by Rusty
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4 hours ago, Rusty said:

Often times it's simply a matter of location.  Foos sources that are along their preferred route are fed on while others seem to be ignored.

Concerning smaller red oak acorns,  the black oak is in the red oak family and looks almost identical to the red.  It's acorns are a little smaller on average than the red.

Do you have any pictures of the red oak?  Bark, leaves, acorns?    

I'll be heading out there a little later to put up a cam.  I'll snap a couple pics.  Drove by this morning, and there were 8 does and fawns chowing down. 

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agree with everything said. oaks season to season are different in tannins/bitterness. size and quantity. a deer could know where acorns are at a particular tree but if they hear some drop or a particular tree is already along their intended path that others will get ignored until another day.

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