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No bolt bolt action a good or a bad idea


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Interesting...

I don't see it as necessarily an improvement on either a bolt or a pump. A lot more movement involved in cycling compared to a BA, and seems kind of complicated/finicky when compared to a sturdy PA. Still, I'm all for people innovating, and it's a cool idea. Some neat little features with the bolt face and take down pieces. 

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It's different.  I noticed both the reporter and the inventor opened the action by moving the stock backwards. 

Having the rifle up to your shoulder (right handed) and twisting the forearm clockwise is not a natural but awkward movement.  I see most lowering the rifle and using both wrists to twist in opposite direction to cycle the action. 

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Ron Spomer is my favorite gun personality/journalist. He does a good job representing innovation while also balancing that with historical performance and relevance. I don’t know who follows after him. The list of next generation is watered down.

Neat concept but that feels clunky to me. I would think more risk to how the scope would be positioned for being knocked in the process amongst other things.

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The maker,Bailey Bradshaw, is a custom gunmaker of some note and was a frequent poster on another rifle orientated forum I browse.

He doesnt care if this “catches on” as he only makes a handful of rifles a year.

He’s known for unusual takes on designs and his buyers willingly wait years for a finished product. Thats the idea, you’re buying a truly bespoke custom rifle in every way including the action design.

 

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4 hours ago, phade said:

Ron Spomer is my favorite gun personality/journalist. He does a good job representing innovation while also balancing that with historical performance and relevance. I don’t know who follows after him. The list of next generation is watered down.

Neat concept but that feels clunky to me. I would think more risk to how the scope would be positioned for being knocked in the process amongst other things.

Scout scope? 

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17 minutes ago, cervidchasers said:

Scout scope? 

Any scope really. The mounts are on the front which is what would be moving hypothetically with it shouldered. Weird design. Would need to see why it would be more practical durable or better performing, or somehow cheaper for same performance.

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1 hour ago, phade said:

Any scope really. The mounts are on the front which is what would be moving hypothetically with it shouldered. Weird design. Would need to see why it would be more practical durable or better performing, or somehow cheaper for same performance.

Thats not the point of his builds, its building a different mouse trap for the idea of figuring out a different mouse trap that hints at the traditional form,but in a unique way.

Look at his rising block single and double rifles. Instead of an independent falling block guided inside the rails of an action, the entire action slides at the breech face. And still locks up tight on the rise and compensates for wear over the life of the gun. 

Most double rifles are built off a shotgun action; mostly sxs, but also o/u; so the action opens on a pin. He takes the hinge out of the equation.

Practical? Better? Maybe yes or maybe no.

Not traditional and different way to think about it…..Absolutely(he’s also built several single and double falling block rifles of his own design)

And if you have to ask how much? You dont have enough. He’s not in the budget friendly zone, again thats not the point.

 

Edited by Dinsdale
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1 hour ago, Dinsdale said:

Thats not the point of his builds, its building a different mouse trap for the idea of figuring out a different mouse trap that hints at the traditional form,but in a unique way.

Look at his rising block single and double rifles. Instead of an independent falling block guided inside the rails of an action, the entire action slides at the breech face. And still locks up tight on the rise and compensates for wear over the life of the gun. 

Most double rifles are built off a shotgun action; mostly sxs, but also o/u; so the action opens on a pin. He takes the hinge out of the equation.

Practical? Better? Maybe yes or maybe no.

Not traditional and different way to think about it…..Absolutely(he’s also built several single and double falling block rifles of his own design)

And if you have to ask how much? You dont have enough. He’s not in the budget friendly zone, again thats not the point.

 

Is he the same guy who builds those rotary action two shot guns ?

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Darne made rotary actions long ago.

Geo. Hoenig was a smith that has made all kinds of rotaries.

Heres another Bradshaw piece. If you watch this, it’s truly amazing the engineering and craftsmanship to make this work. I’m not saying it’s a better functionally, economically etc. But if one doesnt see the artistry in wood and metal from a guy who does everything himself, from engraving, checkering,metal….well, stick to basspro shops rack or a smith who assembles black rifle parts with a cordless and a hammer from harbor freight. LOL

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVC0wwgfVcw

Edited by Dinsdale
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2 minutes ago, Dinsdale said:

Darne made rotary actions long ago.

Geo. Hoenig was a smith that has made all kinds of rotaries.

Heres another Bradshaw piece. If you watch this, it’s truly amazing the engineering and craftsmanship to make this work. I’m not saying it’s a better functionally, economically etc. But if one doesnt see the artistry in wood and metal from a guy who does everything himself, from engraving, checkering,metal….well, stick to basspro shops rack or a smith who assembles black rifle parts with a cordless and a hammer from harbor freight. LOL

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVC0wwgfVcw

Sorry, but those designs don't do anything at all. If something doesn't change the overall operation of a current design, it's not visible. 

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7 hours ago, Dinsdale said:

Darne made rotary actions long ago.

Geo. Hoenig was a smith that has made all kinds of rotaries.

Heres another Bradshaw piece. If you watch this, it’s truly amazing the engineering and craftsmanship to make this work. I’m not saying it’s a better functionally, economically etc. But if one doesnt see the artistry in wood and metal from a guy who does everything himself, from engraving, checkering,metal….well, stick to basspro shops rack or a smith who assembles black rifle parts with a cordless and a hammer from harbor freight. LOL

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVC0wwgfVcw

Thanks for explaining this, I had never heard of him. Engineering meets art meets innovation. Very cool. 

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10 hours ago, Dinsdale said:

Thats not the point of his builds, its building a different mouse trap for the idea of figuring out a different mouse trap that hints at the traditional form,but in a unique way.

Look at his rising block single and double rifles. Instead of an independent falling block guided inside the rails of an action, the entire action slides at the breech face. And still locks up tight on the rise and compensates for wear over the life of the gun. 

Most double rifles are built off a shotgun action; mostly sxs, but also o/u; so the action opens on a pin. He takes the hinge out of the equation.

Practical? Better? Maybe yes or maybe no.

Not traditional and different way to think about it…..Absolutely(he’s also built several single and double falling block rifles of his own design)

And if you have to ask how much? You dont have enough. He’s not in the budget friendly zone, again thats not the point.

 

Whatever the point is, I don’t think most people would latch onto it besides rich people who collect? Or are you thinking this is some avenue to an advancement that the masses will eventually support?

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