Jump to content
IGNORED

Old Find Revisited


Recommended Posts

My brother found this head in the water in Lake Hopatcong NJ @1980. We lost it for 30 years and it turned up a couple months ago. I brought it to our resident geologist / primitive archery sherpa @Dinorockswho reached out to a colleague and here are his findings: 

 


Good info provided below for context...it helps a lot.  Point types and raw material names tend to change with geography
so I'm talking in New York lingo about something from NJ so need to be aware it may not apply.
This looks to me like maybe slate or possibly rhyolite, also silicified sandstone could be a possibility and there is even something called dacite 
that I purchase from time to time for flintknapping.  I say rhyolite or slate.   
The point type is similar to Dustin, Lamoka and Normanskill points from NY and the Great lakes area so Middle-to-Late Archaic in age,
maybe about 4-5,000 years old.

Definitely NOT bow-and-arrow...its much too old for that.  No bow in eastern woodland until after about 700 AD as far as we know.
Most likely a dart thrown by Atl-Atl or a spear.  Its big and clunky    

 
Douglas J. Perrelli, Ph. D., RPA
Chair, NYS Board for Historic Preservation
President, New York Archaeological Council (NYAC)
Director, Archaeological Survey

 

 

 

5394C0F9-C504-496E-824D-2B35866B853D.jpeg

9FBEFEB2-D82C-4078-BA39-5189339BD284.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

very cool! I was reading this the other day. Not too solidly sure on the methodolgy here but interesting. https://www.themeateater.com/conservation/anthropology/mammoth-discovery-would-double-timeline-of-humans-in-north-america

"it's pointless for humans to paint scenes of nature when they can go outside and stand in it"- Ron Swanson

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, The_Real_TCIII said:

My brother found this head in the water in Lake Hopatcong NJ @1980. We lost it for 30 years and it turned up a couple months ago. I brought it to our resident geologist / primitive archery sherpa @Dinorockswho reached out to a colleague and here are his findings: 

 


Good info provided below for context...it helps a lot.  Point types and raw material names tend to change with geography
so I'm talking in New York lingo about something from NJ so need to be aware it may not apply.
This looks to me like maybe slate or possibly rhyolite, also silicified sandstone could be a possibility and there is even something called dacite 
that I purchase from time to time for flintknapping.  I say rhyolite or slate.   
The point type is similar to Dustin, Lamoka and Normanskill points from NY and the Great lakes area so Middle-to-Late Archaic in age,
maybe about 4-5,000 years old.

Definitely NOT bow-and-arrow...its much too old for that.  No bow in eastern woodland until after about 700 AD as far as we know.
Most likely a dart thrown by Atl-Atl or a spear.  Its big and clunky    

 
Douglas J. Perrelli, Ph. D., RPA
Chair, NYS Board for Historic Preservation
President, New York Archaeological Council (NYAC)
Director, Archaeological Survey

 

 

 

5394C0F9-C504-496E-824D-2B35866B853D.jpeg

9FBEFEB2-D82C-4078-BA39-5189339BD284.jpeg

So, Lake Hopatcong is today a man made lake dammed in the 1800s by the Morris Canal and Banking Society to flood the Morris Canal. It is very near the headwaters of the Musconetcong River, a 45 mile long trout river in NJ’s Highlands region that flows southwest into the Delaware River above Phillipsburg, NJ. The Musconetcong or “Musky” as we locals call it comes from the Lenni Lenape Indians who lacked a written language. Musconetcong is the spelling reached after English, Scotch/Irish and German settlers wrote down after hearing the Indians’ word that sounded more like “musk-ah-net-kunk” which to them meant “two lakes flowing from a river” as before white man built the dam in the 1800s, the river in fact formed above this area and flowed through two small glacial lakes and back out as the river. 
 

The river was an important area for the Lenape. They caught American Shad, eels, brook trout, and likely other fish to eat through the seasons and the Plenge Site along this river was one of the most important early settlements discovered centuries later. That is your history lesson of the area for the day. :)

Edited by Bucksnbows
Clarity

"A sinking fly is closer to Hell" - Anonymous 

 

https://www.troutscapes.com

https://nativefishcoalition.org/national-board

Link to comment
Share on other sites

45 minutes ago, Bucksnbows said:

So, Lake Hopatcong is today a man made lake dammed in the 1800s by the Morris Canal and Banking Society to flood the Morris Canal. It is very near the headwaters of the Musconetcong River, a 45 mile long trout river in NJ’s Highlands region that flows southwest into the Delaware River above Phillipsburg, NJ. The Musconetcong or “Musky” as we locals call it comes from the Lenni Lenape Indians who lacked a written language. Musconetcong is the spelling reached after English, Scotch/Irish and German settlers wrote down after hearing the Indians’ word that sounded more like “musk-ah-net-kunk” which to them meant “two lakes flowing from a river” as before white man built the dam in the 1800s, the river in fact formed above this area and flowed through two small glacial lakes and back out as the river. 
 

The river was an important area for the Lenape. They caught American Shad, eels, brook trout, and likely other fish to eat through the seasons and the Plenge Site along this river was one of the most important early settlements discovered centuries later. That is your history lesson of the area for the day. :)

I lived on Musconetcong Ave in Lake Hopatcong and caught a lot of catfish in Lake Musconetcong. I plan to fish the river someday, I know its a highly touted trout stream

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, The_Real_TCIII said:

I lived on Musconetcong Ave in Lake Hopatcong and caught a lot of catfish in Lake Musconetcong. I plan to fish the river someday, I know its a highly touted trout stream

Reach out if you do. I was on Trout Unlimited’s Eastern Conservation staff for 7 years as their Musconetcong Home Rivers Initiative coordinator. I know every inch of the river and have been involved in 8 dam removals and several miles of river restoration on the mainstem and tributaries. I also used to guide fly anglers on it for over a decade. 

"A sinking fly is closer to Hell" - Anonymous 

 

https://www.troutscapes.com

https://nativefishcoalition.org/national-board

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...